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Local News Archives for 2023-11

La Cantina on Main Set to Spice Up Downtown Canton – Lunch, Dinner, and Night Life Spot Opens Early 2024

Opening at 210 East Main Street early next year, La Cantina on Main will offer an affordable lunch menu, a dinner experience with lounge area and event space, and a nightlife-­?style concept featuring live music.

With dishes that explore the diverse regions of Mexico, La Cantina on Main hopes to honor the Mexican culture and capture the spirit of family. Owners and founders Jose Luna, Ramon Benitez, and Guillermo Pomares share more than 50 years of combined experience in the restaurant and hospitality industries.

Luna, who also manages Canton’s CaliFino Tequila distribution center for Georgia, says the trio of owners intend to create a destination for residents and visitors, helping to create good memories and add to the magic of Downtown.

Luna says, “We are excited to share our family traditions, to serve authentic food from key regions of Mexico, and to bring an entertaining night life experience to our community.” La Cantina on Main’s founders live in Canton, Woodstock, and Marietta.

With deep local ties to Cherokee County, Benitez – who also owns the area’s Dos Margaritas locations – says the restaurant expects to be open 7 days a week, from lunchtime into the late night hours. “We are looking forward to being a part of the special story of Canton and the surrounding area for decades to come,” Benitez says. “Come explore Canton, Georgia!”

Cherokee Recreation and Parks was honored earlier this month with several awards at the Georgia Recreation and Park Association's Annual Conference.

CANTON, GA (Nov. 29, 2023) – Cherokee Recreation and Parks was honored earlier this month with several awards at the Georgia Recreation and Park Association’s Annual Conference. 

The conference took place Nov. 6-9 in Athens, Georgia and drew attendees from park agencies in both cities and counties throughout the state.   

Of the awards received, Cherokee Recreation and Parks earned Outstanding Program for TRopical Night at the Oasis at the Cherokee County Aquatic Center.

The program is designed for individuals with special needs and includes a night of swimming, games and fun at the Cherokee County Aquatic Center’s indoor recreational pool.

“We are very honored to have received this award,” said Cherokee Recreation and Parks Director Jay Worley. “We have accomplished so much this year, and it is all in part to our hard-working staff who continue to take on new projects with excitement and enthusiasm.” 

Other awards received include Yvonne Curtis being named Volunteer of the Year. Curtis volunteers for Cherokee Recreation and Parks’ Youth Athletics Programs specifically Georgia Academy Baseball where she serves as the team visibility committee chair ensuring the organization’s presence across multiple platforms.


ABOUT CHEROKEE COUNTY

Located 30 miles north of downtown Atlanta, Cherokee County is part of the 11-county metro-Atlanta area. Cherokee County boasts a population of more than 281,000, according to the July 2022 Census estimates. It is the one of the fastest growing counties in the metro region and its overall Board of Commissioners-controlled tax burden per capita is one of the lowest in the region.  Cherokee County has award-winning parks and recreational facilities, is a destination for corporate headquarters and is a great place to live, work and play. Cherokee County is the best of both worlds because it’s where “Metro Meets the Mountains.” Learn more at cherokeega.com.

Keep Cherokee Beautiful to host Electronics Recycling Event Dec. 9

CANTON, GA (Nov. 28, 2023) – The Cherokee County Recycling Center, in partnership with ECO Trading LLC, is hosting an electronics recycling event Dec. 9, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., at the County Administration Building located at 1130 Bluffs Parkway in Canton.

“The Cherokee County Recycling Center is pleased to provide this opportunity to our residents to dispose of their household electronics properly,” said Cherokee County Recycling Center Manager Troy Brazie. “This year, all of the proceeds from the event will go to benefit Keep Cherokee Beautiful.”

Items accepted at no charge include personal computers, laptops, modems, floppy/disk drives, printers, batteries, CD-ROMS, fax machines, cell phones, circuit boards, copiers, phones, PC power supplies, stereos/VCR/CD players, scanners, keyboards, typewriters, toner cartridges, mouse/mice, text equipment, wire/cabling, PC monitors and networking equipment.

Televisions are accepted for a $20 fee. CRT monitors are $10 each and large projection TVs are $40. Accepted payments include cash, credit cards and personal checks. 

Items not accepted are wooden cabinet TV sets, gas-powered equipment, tires, household trash and appliances.

This is a drive-through event. People should remain in their car, and volunteers will take all equipment from the vehicle. Please remove any equipment from boxes and cables from each device. All cables may be placed in a bag for drop off that day.

For more information, call the Recycling Center at 770-516-4195. 


ABOUT CHEROKEE COUNTY

Located 30 miles north of downtown Atlanta, Cherokee County is part of the 11-county metro-Atlanta area. Cherokee County boasts a population of more than 281,000, according to the July 2022 Census estimates. It is the one of the fastest growing counties in the metro region and its overall Board of Commissioners-controlled tax burden per capita is one of the lowest in the region.  Cherokee County has award-winning parks and recreational facilities, is a destination for corporate headquarters and is a great place to live, work and play. Cherokee County is the best of both worlds because it’s where “Metro Meets the Mountains.” Learn more at cherokeega.com.

Make the Holidays Sweeter with History Cherokee's Historic Sweetscapes

CANTON, GA – People are flocking to the Cherokee County History Center to view Historic Sweetscapes: A Gingerbread Journey through Cherokee County. The mini exhibit, on display in History Center’s Ken White Main Hall, features five historic Cherokee County buildings meticulously recreated in gingerbread and other confectionery delights. And although it may be hard to choose, guests are encouraged to vote for their favorite Sweetcape. The people’s choice winner will be announced in late December. 

This year’s Historic Sweetscapes journey takes us to: 

Ball Ground - Jill’s Cakes and Bakes created the Historic Ball Ground City Hall and Fire Station. The building, which served as City Hall, the courthouse, jail, and storage for the town’s fire hose cart from the early 1900s to 2006, is now home to Scooped on Main. 

Canton - Whim-Wham Art Farm created Cotton Mill #1 from the Canton Cotton Mills. This rendition of the historic mill in downtown Canton includes a train, Salty Dog, Cat’s Meow, and the historic mulberry tree.  The Canton Cotton Mills operated from 1899 until 1981. Today, the mills have been repurposed into The Mill on Etowah with stores, restaurants, event spaces and more. 

Holly Springs - Coco’s Confections Atl created the Holly Springs Train Depot. The train depot was constructed in the early 1900s by L & N Railroad and used primarily as a freight depot. When service ended in Holly Springs in 1959, the building was leased to the town and served as City Hall. The City of Holly Springs now owns the building and uses it as a community center.  

Waleska -Quinland Farms created Cline’s Store in Waleska. Cline’s Store was built in the 1920s by Luther and Levi Cline. The store remained in operation for nearly a century, first as a general store then as an antique store. 

Woodstock - Bananas and Beehives created Commercial Row in Woodstock. Commercial Row is currently home to restaurants, bars, and shops, although it is most noted for having once been home to Dean’s Store (now the Woodstock Visitors Center). Originally Dean’s Drug Store, the store was opened by Dr. W. H. Dean in 1906 and was in operation until 1981. 

Historic Sweetscapes: A Gingerbread Journey through Cherokee County can be viewed in the Cherokee County History Center’s Ken White Main Hall through December 17. The exhibit is free for History Cherokee members to view and included with general admission for non-members. For more information, including admission prices and hours of operation, visit historycherokee.org.  


About History Cherokee

History Cherokee operates the Cherokee County History Center and the Historic Rock Bark. History Cherokee’s mission is the collection, preservation, and interpretation of Cherokee County history.

Highlights from the Nov. 21 BOC meeting

(NOV. 22, 2023) -- The Cherokee Board of Commissioners received an update from Keep Cherokee Beautiful, the nonprofit organization that is volunteer led and county supported, with a focus on keeping Cherokee County clean, green and beautiful.  

District 3 Commissioner Benny Carter was instrumental in resurrecting KCB in 2020 – since then, the organization has more than 40 miles adopted through the Adopt-A-Mile program, has implemented a monthly newsletter garnering a nearly 50 percent open rate, and offered more services like electronics recycling events.

This year, 27 Adopt-A-Mile events have been held with more than 215 volunteers serving nearly 500 hours. An estimated 10,280 pounds of litter has been removed from Cherokee County’s roadways.

“I am proud of how far Keep Cherokee Beautiful has come in only three short years,” said Carter, who was unable to attend the meeting due to illness. “It has taken the county and volunteers working together to make it happen. I’m excited to see how the organization can grow in the future for the benefit of our county and our residents.”

“It is working. It’s amazing and vibrant. On behalf of our organizations, we want to say thank you to the Commissioners and thank you to Commissioner Carter for getting us going,” said KCB Board President Mark Preetorius.

As part of its presentation, Keep Cherokee Beautiful presented the Canton Optimist Club with Adopt-A-Mile Group of the Year and Craig Myers with Volunteer of the Year.

KCB also announced its electronic recycling event fundraiser set for Dec. 9 at the Cherokee County Administration Building at the Bluffs, 1130 Bluffs Parkway, Canton. The event will take place from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

At the Nov. 21 meeting, the Board also:

  • Approved, 4-0, reappointing Jo Ellen Hancock to the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities Advisory Council for three years. Chairman Harry Johnston made the motion, which was seconded by District 4 Commissioner Corey Ragsdale.
  • Approved, 4-0, the minutes from the Nov. 7 work session, executive session and regular meeting. District 2 Commissioner Richard Weatherby made the motion, which was seconded by Commissioner Ragsdale.
  • Held a public hearing on updates to the zoning ordinance related to minor subdivisions. One person spoke. The proposal is increasing the number of lots allowed in a minor plat subdivision from five to seven lots increases the maximum number of lots that may provide individual access to a public right-of-way without having to build a single road to serve all lots. This change may increase the number of large lot minor subdivisions in the unincorporated County by easing the access requirements. Approved, 4-0, the proposed changes excluding family cottages and striking wording about direct appeal to the Board of Commissioners. District 1 Commissioner Steve West made the motion, which was seconded by Commissioner Ragsdale.
  • Held a public hearing on proposed text amendments to Article 7, Table 7.1A Minimum District Development Standards, reducing the required side and rear setbacks in the GC (General Agriculture), R-80 (Estate Residential) and R-60 (Single-Family Residential) zoning districts to allow more flexibility in building placement on larger residential lots. The revised table introduces a front building setback of 50 feet on four-lane collector roads to reduce confusion. The amendments also included adding the Corporate Park district into the table while removing three zoning districts that are no longer available; HC (Highway Corridor), OD (Office Distribution) and PID (Planned Industrial Development). No one spoke. Commissioner Ragsdale made the motion to adopt the changes with one amendment, which was seconded by Commissioner Weatherby. The vote was 4-0.
  • Held a public hearing regarding revisions to Articles 4 and 5 concerning Guest Quarters. The proposed Family Quarters provisions are designed to modify the existing regulations to allow a subordinate living unit on lots of 40,000 square feet or more to support Cherokee families. The amendments set out seven requirements that must be met by Family Cottages in Section 5.6E including an owner residency requirement. Two people spoke during the public hearing.  Commissioner Weatherby made the motion to postpone the decision until Dec. 19, which was seconded by Commissioner Ragsdale. The vote was 4-0.
  • Held a public hearing to consider a board-initiated rezoning of 4.5 acres owned by the county at 255 Old Mill Road. The rezoning is from General Commercial and Neighborhood Commercial with conditions to General Commercial. The county intends to sell the property.  Staff discussed options for the Board to consider in terms of GC versus NC zoning of the whole parcel. One person spoke. Commissioner West made the motion to rezone the property to NC with no conditions, which was seconded by Commissioner Weatherby. The vote was 4-0.
  • Held a public hearing to consider a board-initiated rezoning per a settlement agreement between Hazel Creek Properties LLC and Cherokee County. The request is to rezone the 3.4-acre parcel is at 3202 Hickory Flat Hwy. from R-40 to Office/Institutional and Neighborhood Commercial with conditions. Five people spoke. Commissioner West made the motion to postpone the decision until Jan. 2, which was seconded by Commissioner Weatherby. The vote was 4-0.
  • Approved, 4-0, the request to withdraw without prejudice a zoning modification request to eliminate a 2019 zoning condition restricting outdoor storage on the 9.86-acre parcel at 7222 Cumming Highway, and modify two other conditions to alter the plans. The applicant wants to add outdoor RV and boat storage on the interior of the property and construct a non-retail building facing Ga. 20 next to the existing structure. The applicant requested to withdraw this application without prejudice.  Commissioner West made the motion, which was seconded by Commissioner Weatherby.
  • Approved, 4-0, notifying the city of Holly Springs that the county does not object to an annexation request of 18.49 acres at Univeter Road and Hickory Flat Highway but directed staff to share the Board’s concerns. The property is within the growth boundary agreement. The intent is to rezone the property from Agriculture to Traditional Neighborhood Development for a 73-unit single-family detached home, age-targeted neighborhood. However, the applicant is working with Transportation to accommodate upcoming improvements to Univeter Road, which may reduce the number of units on the property. The Board suggests to the City to reduce the allowed density to be more compatible with the county’s land use plan with calls for one unit per acre on most of the property and two units per acre or light commercial on the Highway 140 frontage, leave a passageway to ensure no unincorporated island is created, and to leave right of way for the transportation improvement project slated for the roadway, work with the county to determine best access onto Univeter Road or with GDOT for access onto Highway 140. Commissioner Weatherby made the motion, which was seconded by Commissioner West.
  • Approved, 4-0, notifying the city of Holly Springs that the county does not object to an annexation request of 6.33 acres on Edmondson Lane but directed staff to share concerns with the city. The rezoning request to the city is from R-40 and General Commercial to Traditional Neighborhood Development. The plan for the acreage is a 50-unit townhome residential subdivision. Concerns to be shared with the city include the proposed density exceeds the county’s land use plan, annexation could potentially create an unincorporated island and the applicant must show a connection to prevent this, and further development on Edmondson Lane increases need for dedicated left lane along Holly Springs Parkway to be widened to the east. Commissioner Weatherby made the motion, which was seconded by Commissioner West.
  • Approved, 4-0, the consent agenda, which included: acceptance of all rights of way, roadways and appurtenant drainage structures in the Vaughn Estates subdivision; acceptance of a two-year federal grant award on behalf of the Juvenile Drug Treatment Court in the amount of $377,657 for fiscal years 2024 and 2025 and a corresponding budget amendment in the amount of $314,716 to allocate the federal award and the 25 percent match for 12 months; acceptance of a two-year federal grant on behalf of the Family Treatment Court in the amount of $363,847 for fiscal years 2024 and 2025 and a corresponding budget amendment totaling $303,109 to allocate the federal award and the required 25 percent match for 12 months; a part-time kitchen aide position for Senior Services; and calling for a public hearing on Jan. 2 for a request by Next Step Ministries to modify zoning conditions pertaining to case 85-10-079. Commissioner Ragsdale made the motion, which was seconded by Commissioner West.
  • Approved, 4-0, renewal of the agreement for Public Safety Secured Virtual Public Network in the amount of $48,377.65, a $86.98 per device per year. Commissioner Ragsdale made the motion, which was seconded by Commissioner Weatherby.
  • Approved, 4-0, the renewal of the county’s current multi-factor authentication solution for an additional one-year term. The cost is $57,482.93. Commissioner Weatherby made the motion, which was seconded by Commissioner Ragsdale.
  • Approved, 4-0, amendment two to the MACH Fire Station Alerting agreement with Motorola on behalf of Fire & Emergency Services. The change order is for $36,261. The approval also includes a budget amendment to transfer $611,997 to the fiscal year 2024 budget that was allocated in the 2023 budget but not expended because Motorola didn’t meet the project milestones in FY2023. The budget amendment will transfer $678,859 from Fire Reserves to the FY2024 budget. Commissioner Ragsdale made the motion, which was seconded by Commissioner Weatherby.
  • Approved, 4-0, a proposal from Practical Design Partners, LLC to perform design engineering for the Bells Ferry Road at Bascomb Commercial Parkway Drainage Improvement Project under the annual engineering consulting services contract. The cost is $17,905. Commissioner Ragsdale made the motion, which was seconded by Commissioner Weatherby.
  • Approved, 4-0, a proposal from Southeastern Engineering, Inc. to perform design engineering for the Victory Drive at Owl Creek Drainage Improvement Project under the annual engineering consulting services contract. The cost is $60,000. Commissioner Ragsdale made the motion, which was seconded by Commissioner Weatherby.
  • Approved, 4-0, amendment one to the construction agreement with J.G. Leone, Inc. for the Shoal Creek Road over Puckett Creek Improvement Project. The cost is $58,110. Commissioner Weatherby made the motion, which was seconded by Commissioner West.
  • Approved, 4-0, a Professional Services Agreement with Curb-Tech for removal and replacement of a concrete slab at the Cherokee Aquatic Center. The cost is $96,465. Commissioner Ragsdale made the motion, which was seconded by Commissioner Weatherby.
  • Approved, 4-0, a park use agreement with 112 Events, LLC for use of Cherokee Veterans Park for the holiday lights event. Commissioner Weatherby made the motion, which was seconded by Commissioner Ragsdale.
  • Approved, 4-0, a sales agreement for 180 Riverchase Drive in the amount of $14,000 and authorization for the county manager to execute the sales agreement and closing documents on behalf of the county. Commissioner Ragsdale made the motion, which was seconded by Commissioner Weatherby.
  • Approved, 4-0, an agreement with Alscan, Inc. for installation services to remove all existing Justice Center surveillance cameras and install upgraded cameras. The cost is $177,591.40 funded by APRA. Commissioner West made the motion, which was seconded by Commissioner Ragsdale.
  • Tabled, 4-0, until the Jan. 2 meeting, a resolution to waive the residency distance requirement for six proposed distilled spirits package stores. Commissioner Weatherby made the motion, which was seconded by Commissioner Ragsdale.
  • Tabled, 4-0, until the Jan. 2 meeting, resolutions to waive the alcohol licensee residency requirements for alcohol licenses of retail distilled spirits package stores. Commissioner Weatherby made the motion, which was seconded by Commissioner Ragsdale.

3 Redneck Tenors Roll into Falany with Holiday Performance Dec. 4

WALESKA, GA (Nov.  17, 2023) –  What happens when you mix classically trained tenors with standup comedy and improv? The result is 3 Redneck Tenors.  They will bring their musical comedy to the Falany Performing Arts Center on Dec. 4 at 3 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. for a special holiday performance.

3 Redneck TenorsWith a new twist on the tenor genre, 3 Redneck Tenors feature classically trained Broadway and opera stars performing classic, pop, and downhome music.  

Their “XMAS SPEC-TAC-YULE-AR” holiday special combines humor with classical musical arrangements and vocals.  The Redneck Christmas special includes holiday tunes such as “White Christmas,” “O Holy Night,” “Jingle Bells” and “Silent Night.”

“’3 Redneck Tenors is a crowd favorite - and Falany staff favorite - with downhome laughter and toe-tapping music,” said Jessica Akers, director of the Falany Performing Arts Center. “This holiday show is perfect for the entire family.”

The trio were top finalists on “America’s Got Talent” and have been entertaining audiences since 2006.  The show is written by opera veteran Matthew Lord with music arranged by award-winning composer Craig Bohmler.  

Tickets are $40 to $45 for adults, $35 to $40 for seniors, and $10 to $15 for children (12 and younger). Tickets can be purchased at Reinhardt.edu/fpac or by calling the box office at 770-720-9167.


Falany Logo

About the Falany Performing Arts Center

The Falany Performing Arts Center is a world-class facility overlooking Lake Mullenix on the beautiful campus of Reinhardt University in Waleska. With Flint Hall, an impressive concert hall, and the beautiful marble Ken White Atrium, this concert venue is one of a kind. Since its first year in the performing arts, guests have commented on their wonderful experiences with the convenient free parking, meet-and-greet with artists, and intimate performances.  The Falany Performing Arts Center has hosted a variety of events, from theatrical productions, chamber groups, student productions and recitals, and popular ensembles such as the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra. The main attraction of this concert hall is its state-of-the-art acoustic and tunable stage. Known as one of the best concert halls in the Southeast, musicians, theatre groups, and guest speakers have enjoyed the quality sound the concert hall provides.  

Reinhardt University Logo

About Reinhardt University

Founded in 1883, Reinhardt University is a private, comprehensive institution grounded in the liberal arts. Reinhardt offers more than 40?graduate and undergraduate programs online and on campus, including business, education, music, theater, and nursing. Reinhardt’s 525-acre campus is ideally located in?Waleska?in the heart of Georgia’s high country and nearby the great international city of Atlanta. For more information, please contact Reinhardt at (770) 720-5600 or see Reinhardt.edu.?  

Happy 30th Anniversary to CASA of Cherokee County!

Court Appointed Special Advocates of Cherokee County Celebrates 30 Years of Child Advocacy

This year marks 30 years of Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA), a program of The Children’s Haven, serving children experiencing foster care in Cherokee County. CASA volunteers provide child advocacy and are the voice for children, advocating for their best interests. To celebrate and commemorate this special milestone, a luncheon was held to honor CASA volunteers, past and present. Marcie Smith, Executive Director of The Children’s Haven shared, “We are thrilled to celebrate our dedicated CASA volunteers as we honor 30 years of child advocacy in Cherokee County. Our CASA volunteers are the heartbeat of our mission at The Children’s Haven. They truly make a difference in the lives of our kids who are experiencing foster care. We are so grateful for this community and the faithful support they have invested in our work. We know wonderful things will happen in our program’s next 30 years!”

The event was also attended by elected officials, Cherokee County judges, county and state community partners as well as generous sponsors, with Northside Hospital Cherokee as the presenting sponsor for the celebration. Sarah Mackey, Chief Development Officer with National CASA, shared about the history of the CASA organization and Jennifer King, Executive Director of Georgia CASA, thanked the community for supporting our local program and Georgia CASA’s valued work covering all 159 counties in the state of Georgia. Harry Johnston, Chairman of the Cherokee County Board of Commissioners, read a county proclamation, declaring October 20, 2023 as Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) Day in Cherokee County, Georgia in honor of the organization’s 30th Anniversary. State Representative Mandi Ballinger presented a resolution commemorating the 30th anniversary of the CASA program and recognizing the dedicated work of volunteers. Judge Jennifer Davis shared family and child well-being statistics from Cherokee County as well as the state of Georgia, indicating that Cherokee County is the third highest in the state for the number of children in foster care. On October 20th, there were 429 Cherokee County children in foster care. These statistics are a reminder of the significant need for CASA volunteers, as well as highlighting the urgency for additional CASA volunteers in order to provide an advocate for every child experiencing foster care.

Since its founding 30 years ago in 1993, Court Appointed Special Advocates for Children in Cherokee County has trained 816 community volunteers, advocated for 2,906 children experiencing foster care due to abuse and neglect and donated more than 156,278 hours of service. Every year, there are more than 10,000 children in Georgia experiencing the foster care system at no fault of their own due to abuse and neglect and they rely on adults to advocate on their behalf. Last year alone, over 167 Cherokee CASA volunteers advocated for nearly 357 children in our state’s legal custody, providing each child with impartial advocacy that nurtures hope, seeks solutions, and stands in the gap between a challenging present and a promising future. A CASA volunteer is a deeply committed, specially trained individual from the community who is appointed by the juvenile court judge to improve a child’s experience in foster care by providing individualized attention, bringing urgency to children’s needs throughout their time in state custody, and offering consistency and continuity by helping to connect information among case managers, foster parents, attorneys, and many other stakeholders.

In celebration of this momentous occasion, the CASA program is aiming to raise $30,000 in honor and celebration of 30 years. CASA volunteers are needed to be the voice for all children in foster care. Funds raised will allow the CASA program to train additional volunteers to serve each child in need. To give, volunteer or learn more, please visit CherokeeChildrensHaven.org. Also, follow The Children’s Haven on Facebook, Instagram and Linked In to stay connected to their mission.

CASA is a program of The Children’s Haven. The Children’s Haven is located at 1083 Marietta Hwy., Canton and is home to four programs focused on prevention and support services for at-risk families: Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA), Wellstar Family Visitation Center, Prevent Child Abuse Cherokee In-Home Parenting Program and Chin Up Mentorship Program. The mission at The Children’s Haven is to promote the health and happiness of children impacted by abuse and neglect. For more information, please visit CherokeeChildrensHaven.org.

The Cherokee Area Transportation System (CATS) celebrates receiving a clean 2023 Triennial Review from the Federal Transportation Administration (FTA).

CANTON, GA (Nov. 17, 2023) – The Cherokee Area Transportation System (CATS) celebrates receiving a clean 2023 Triennial Review from the Federal Transportation Administration (FTA).

The triennial review process for transportation, conducted by the FTA, is a rigorous and thorough assessment that evaluates various aspects of transit agencies' operations. This assessment spans multiple areas, ensuring compliance with federal regulations, safety protocols, and operational standards.

“The review process typically covering a three-year period,” said CATS Director Greg Powell. “In our case it was extended to four years due to the disruptions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. This adjustment allowed for a more comprehensive examination of CATS performance and adherence to standards over a more extended operational period.”

During these evaluations, the FTA examines categories, including but not limited to ADA compliance, procurement procedures, drug and alcohol policies, and vehicle maintenance. Each area is analyzed to ensure that transit agencies adhere to set guidelines and maintain high standards in their operations.

“CATS’ commendable performance throughout the review is noteworthy,” said Cherokee County Public Services Agency Director Bryan Reynolds. “CATS received a clean bill of health with zero outstanding findings which is a testament to its dedication to maintaining impeccable compliance standards.”

Interdepartmental collaboration was a key to the evaluation's success. Several county departments that included Procurement, Finance, Risk Management, Fleet Maintenance and Property Maintenance worked in contributing their expertise and efforts to facilitate a successful review process ensuring that CATS met the necessary standards and requirements.

“The rarity of achieving this outcome, especially within an extended four-year review period and in collaboration with multiple departments, underscores CATS’ commitment to excellence in transportation operations and regulatory compliance,” said Powell.

To learn more about CATS visit www.cherokeega.com/transportation.


ABOUT CHEROKEE COUNTY

Located 30 miles north of downtown Atlanta, Cherokee County is part of the 11-county metro-Atlanta area. Cherokee County boasts a population of more than 281,000, according to the July 2022 Census estimates. It is the one of the fastest growing counties in the metro region and its overall Board of Commissioners-controlled tax burden per capita is one of the lowest in the region.  Cherokee County has award-winning parks and recreational facilities, is a destination for corporate headquarters and is a great place to live, work and play. Cherokee County is the best of both worlds because it’s where “Metro Meets the Mountains.” Learn more at cherokeega.com.

Food drive collect open until Dec. 16

(NOV. 14, 2023) -- Cherokee County’s Public Services Agency is collecting food to stock Dominic’s Mission, a nonprofit food pantry located in Ball Ground.

The agency has arranged nine drop-off locations across the county to collect non-perishable food items through Dec. 16.

“We assessed the stock of food pantries within our county, and Dominic’s Mission was in the greatest need for support. They serve about 125-150 families every week and are in desperate need of donations,” said E 9-1-1 Director Shane Bonebrake. “Page Relocation has graciously offered use of one of their moving trucks at no cost, and if we get enough to fill the tractor-trailer that has been offered, we will make the best use of it.”

Bonebrake said he hopes the turnout is so fruitful that Dominic’s Mission can be stocked, as well as other food pantries in the county.

“Please help us fill a tractor-trailer so we can all be a blessing to every food pantry in our county,” Bonebrake said.

Drop-off locations include:

Cherokee County Public Safety

150 Chattin Drive, Canton

Georgia Department of Public Health – Canton Health Dept.

1219 Univeter Road, Canton

Cherokee Marshal’s Office

959 Marietta Hwy., Canton

Georgia Department of Public Health – Woodstock Health Dept.

7545 Main St., #100, Woodstock

Cherokee County Animal Shelter

1015 Univeter Road, Canton

Momentum Church

695 Arnold Mill Road, Woodstock

Cherokee County Administration Building

1130 Bluffs Pkwy., Canton

Canton YMCA

151 Waleska St., Canton

Cherokee Senior Services

1001 Univeter Road, Canton

 

 

All donated food must be non-perishable. When considering items like macaroni and cheese, please choose items that do not require butter or milk to prepare.

Monetary donations can by made via Venmo to E 9-1-1 Deputy Director Linda Miller at @Linda-Miller-97 or by visiting dominicsmission.com and clicking on donate.

ABOUT THE PUBLIC SERVICES AGENCY

The Public Services Agency is led by Director Dana Martin. It encompasses E 9-1-1, Animal Shelter, Marshal’s Office, Probation Services, Emergency Management and Radio Technology.

ABOUT CHEROKEE COUNTY

Located 30 miles north of downtown Atlanta, Cherokee County is part of the 11-county metro-Atlanta area. Cherokee County boasts a population of more than 281,000, according to the July 2022 Census estimates. It is the one of the fastest growing counties in the metro region and its overall Board of Commissioners-controlled tax burden per capita is one of the lowest in the region.  Cherokee County has award-winning parks and recreational facilities, is a destination for corporate headquarters and is a great place to live, work and play. Cherokee County is the best of both worlds because it’s where “Metro Meets the Mountains.” Learn more at cherokeega.com.

Pine Log Mountain Named a Place in Peril

 

Annual List Released Today

(Waleska, GA) The Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation released its 2024 list of ten Places in Peril in the state on November 15. Pine Log Mountain in Bartow County was placed on the list.

Places in Peril raises awareness about Georgia’s significant historic, archaeological, and cultural resources that are threatened by demolition, neglect, inappropriate development, or insensitive public policy. The goal is to bring preservation solutions to the imperiled historic resources. 

Pine Log Mountain is a privately owned 14,134-acre tract of wilderness. It has been put on the public market for sale, and threatened by demolition, after years of being leased by the Georgia Department of Natural Resources as a wildlife management area. 

The location was brought to the attention of the Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation by Reinhardt University Professor, Dr. Donna Coffey Little who explains, “The historical sites on Pine Log Mountain are irreplaceable and with the west side of the mountain up for sale, they could easily be lost forever. The sites include stone-iron furnaces from the late 1830s and early 1840s, a Native American rock wall that may date back to the Woodland era, and the site of the Sugar Hill Convict Labor Camp, which operated from 1876-1909.” 

Dr. Little has been working with the Pinelog Preservation Society to bring public attention to the need to save the wilderness area, its historical sites, and environmental resources. “Pine Log Mountain is an iconic site in both Cherokee and Bartow Counties. It is integral to our history and heritage,” she said. “My hope is that making the Places in Peril list will bring Pine Log Mountain to the attention of both the public and potential donors to help save the site.” 

Today’s placement is welcome news to the community who have a strong attachment to the mountain. Historical documents show Reinhardt students regularly visiting Pine Log Mountain for school outings and social gatherings, as far back as 1911. 


The Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation has provided additional information and high res images: View Press Kit 

Magic of Lights Presented by ANF: Prehistoric Christmas

Let the fun enlighten you! Join us for the Magic of Lights, Prehistoric Edition! #magicoflights #magicoflightswoodstock #dixiespeedway #woodstockga #woodstockgeorgia #cityofwoodstock #holidaycheer #merrychristmas #christmas #prehistoriclights #ANF

2023 City of Canton Mayoral, Council, and Special Election Results

The elections were conducted by the Cherokee County Board of Elections.

(CANTON, Georgia, November 7, 2023) —The City of Canton municipal elections concluded this evening with in person voting following a period of early and advanced voting options. The elections were conducted by the Cherokee County Board of Elections. 

In the race for Mayor, Bill Grant defeated Andy Tubbs. Grant received 1,759 votes (57.5%) compared to Tubbs, who tallied 1,298 votes (42.5%).

In the race to succeed Ms. JoEllen WIlson as Ward 1 Councilor, Mr. Travis Johnson ran unopposed.

Mr. Shawn Tolan ran unopposed to be re-elected for the four-year term for his City Council Ward 2 seat.

In the race to succeed Ms. Brooke Schmidt as Ward 3 Councilor, Farris Yawn defeated Tracye Busbee. Yawn received 1,411 votes (50.3%) compared to Busbee, who collected 1,392 votes (49.7%).

The winners of these four races will be sworn in for four-year terms at the January 4, 2024 Council Meeting.

In the special election to complete the unexpired term of Mr. Will Carlan, there were three candidates. Bryan Roach won the election by gaining a majority of the votes. The final tally was Roach with 1,766 votes (64%) compared to Sammy Baker with 429 votes (15.5%) and Luke Smith with 564 votes (20.5%). The winner will be publicly sworn in at the November 16, 2023 City Council Meeting.

All election results from today will be certified no later than Tuesday, November 14, 2023, by the Cherokee County Board of Elections.

 

Christmas at The Mill Returns to Historic Canton Location, Plus Take to the Ice at Rink on the River through Jan. 15

 

 CANTON, GA – Usher in the holiday season as The Mill on Etowah transforms into a winter wonderland on Friday, Nov. 24 and Saturday, Nov. 25. 

This popular winter festival welcomes more than 200 craft vendors, food vendors, and – of course – Santa and Mrs. Claus! College football streams on the Big Screen on the Green each day, plus celebrate opening weekend for the third annual Rink on the River! 

Christmas at The Mill Schedule Friday and Saturday, Nov. 24 and 25 

Christmas Market, 10 am – 7 pm 

Meet and Greet with Mr. & Mrs. Claus, 11 am – 5pm* * Check in at the Santa Check In Tent to reserve a spot in line. Guests will receive an alert when it is their turn to step into Santa’s Workshop located inside Timbers on Etowah at The Mill. Be sure to bring a camera to capture the magical moments! 

Rink on the River Ice Skating, 11 am – 9 pm 

Football on the Big Screen, TBA 

Tree Lighting and Sing Along with Mr. & Mrs. Claus: Saturday, Nov. 25, 7 pm. 

Festival admission and parking are free. 

Rink on the River Pricing: Children 10 and younger: $12 Adults: $14 The rink stops renting skates one hour prior to closing. For complete Rink on the River hours and more information, visit etowahmill.com/Christmas. 

Local Color Studio, a new community art studio and school, opens Nov. 13, bringing makerspace to Downtown Canton

 CANTON, GA – Local Color Studio, a community art studio for all levels of creatives and artists is set to open at 85 North Street in Downtown Canton on Nov. 13. 

Artist and founder Shanna Coulter will offer studio space and art classes to enhance individual skill levels and contribute culturally to a city on a creative rise. 

“Art is for everyone, and Local Color Studio is a place that supports creativity of all kinds. We designed the studio to build community because creative work takes courage,” Shanna says. Artists can rent studio space long-term and short-term (when available) as well as take and teach classes, use the ceramics studio, and more. 

A working artist, Shanna brings a wide range of experience from painting to ceramics and sculpture to photography. As an art teacher for seven years at Cherokee High School with a degree in art and a master’s in education – both from Kennesaw State University – Shanna combines her artistic vision and passion for teaching in the space at Local Color Studio. 

Co-founder, and Shanna’s husband of 28 years, mortgage loan originator and real estate “finance artist” Chris Coulter manages Local Color Studio’s finances. He says, “The Coolest Small Town in America truly deserves a vibrant, creative center.” 

Originally from Athens, Ga., Shanna and Chris have lived in Cherokee County for 24 years. “We are very grateful to the leadership for their encouragement in Canton for our small business,” Shanna says. “Without the public art vision of City Councilor Brooke Schmidt and Mayor Bill Grant as well as the knowledge and support of County Manager Geoff Morton and the team at Cherokee Office of Economic Development plus Penn Hodge, Grant Schmeelk, and Dana Cox, Local Color Studio would not have been possible. We know the growing creative community in Canton is strong; we are dedicated to serving that community and being a part of Canton’s story.” 

Local Color Studio plans to be open Monday – Saturday, 10 am – 9 pm; Sunday, noon – 5 pm. Artists will have studio access 24/7. Winter workshops and spring class schedules will be posted online soon. 


Local Color Studio

85 North St., Canton

www.localcolor.studio

Instagram and Facebook: @localcolorcanton 

For leasing information contact Shanna or Chris Coulter at 678-269-7441 or chris@localcolor.studio. 

CANTON, GA (Nov. 6, 2023) – Cherokee County employees have created a new local food pantry as part of a community service project.

CANTON, GA (Nov. 6, 2023) – Cherokee County employees have created a new local food pantry as part of a community service project. 

Twenty-five Cherokee County employees participated in the Carl Vinson Institute of Georgia’s Management Development Program (MDP). As part of the program curriculum, participants complete a project that impacts their community. 

“As a class, we wanted to complete a project that would benefit our community and be sustainable for years to come,” said Cherokee County Human Resources Director Kathy Lambert. “We quickly narrowed down the underprivileged communities within Cherokee County and discussed what our greatest impact might be in those areas. We decided to build an outdoor food pantry that would be continuously stocked by organizations and private citizens with a heart to help those in need.”

“Some of us have lived here all our lives. (The citizens) are basically our family,” said EMA Director Daniel Westbrook. “We’re going to take care of them and do what we can. Sometimes you have a stigma in government and that they only care for themselves. Not here. Not in this county.”

This pantry is located outside of the Greater Church located at 5744 Bells Ferry Road in Acworth and will be available to the public 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Pastor Cheno Echevarria, of Greater Church, said he feels the food pantry is placed in a prime location to best serve residents in need. 

“I think it’s beautiful that we are in a county that actually cares for the people and is providing for them, not just with words and political slogans but with actions,” Echevarria said. 

The food pantry will rely on partnerships with several non-profit agencies and private citizens to be restocked. Partnering agencies include the William Facey Food Bank, Stand Up For Seniors and volunteers from the “Blessings Pantries – Cherokee County’s Free Pantries” Facebook group. Additionally, Greater Church’s food pantry will stock the outdoor pantry with support from the Atlanta Community Food Bank and Publix. 

Program participants include 11 employees from Cherokee County Fire and Emergency Services, four from the Community Development Agency, three from the Public Services Agency, two from the Community Services Agency, two from the Cherokee Sheriff’s Offices, one from the Administrative Services Agency, one from the Human Resources department and one from the Cherokee County Office of Elections and Voter Registration. 

The MDP is a 20-day program that extends over a seven- to eight-month period and offers management and leadership development tailored for local government officials.


ABOUT CHEROKEE COUNTY

Located 30 miles north of downtown Atlanta, Cherokee County is part of the 11-county metro-Atlanta area. Cherokee County boasts a population of more than 281,000, according to the July 2022 Census estimates. It is the one of the fastest growing counties in the metro region and its overall Board of Commissioners-controlled tax burden per capita is one of the lowest in the region.  Cherokee County has award-winning parks and recreational facilities, is a destination for corporate headquarters and is a great place to live, work and play. Cherokee County is the best of both worlds because it’s where “Metro Meets the Mountains.” Learn more at cherokeega.com.

CANTON, GA (Nov. 6, 2023) – Cherokee County government offices will be closed on Friday, Nov. 10 in observance of Veterans Day. Offices will reopen Monday, Nov. 13 at their normal time.

CANTON, GA (Nov. 6, 2023) – Cherokee County government offices will be closed on Friday, Nov. 10 in observance of Veterans Day. Offices will reopen Monday, Nov. 13 at their normal time.  


ABOUT CHEROKEE COUNTY

Located 30 miles north of downtown Atlanta, Cherokee County is part of the 11-county metro-Atlanta area. Cherokee County boasts a population of more than 281,000, according to the July 2022 Census estimates. It is the one of the fastest growing counties in the metro region and its overall Board of Commissioners-controlled tax burden per capita is one of the lowest in the region.  Cherokee County has award-winning parks and recreational facilities, is a destination for corporate headquarters and is a great place to live, work and play. Cherokee County is the best of both worlds because it’s where “Metro Meets the Mountains.” Learn more at cherokeega.com.

Reinhardt University is proud to announce that President Mark A. Roberts, PhD, was selected by Georgia Trend magazine to be one of Georgia's most influential leaders.

Reinhardt University is proud to announce that President Mark A. Roberts, PhD, was selected by Georgia Trend magazine to be one of Georgia’s most influential leaders. The Georgia 500 edition of the magazine was published on November 1st. 

Selections were based upon nominations, editorial committee recommendations, and extensive research and interviews, resulting in a selective guide to the Georgians who impact our state. Dr. Roberts’ achievements and recognition of his leadership can be found in the education category of the magazine. 

About this distinction, Dr. Roberts said, "I am once again honored that Georgia Trend Magazine included me among influential educational leaders in Georgia. To be sure, the achievements Reinhardt has accomplished over the years are in great part due to the incredibly talented faculty, students, and staff that make up our learning community. Together, we make our region a better place."

Click to view the magazine article

History Cherokee releases a children's book featuring Salty Dog

CANTON, GA – Bring home Salty Dog for the holidays in History Cherokee’s newest book on local history, “Salty Dog Goes to Denim Day.” Written by Canton screenwriter Jennifer Dunn and beautifully illustrated by noted watercolor artist Elly Hobgood, this book pays tribute to Canton’s favorite droopy-eared mascot, historic downtown Canton, and the Canton Cotton Mills. 

Weaving in historic facts and visits to local Canton landmarks, “Salty Dog Goes to Denim Day” takes readers on a delightful journey through the heart of 1960s downtown Canton and into the daily bustle of the Canton Cotton Mills. Salty Dog’s mama works at the Canton Cotton Mills. One day she heads out for work, accidentally leaving her lunchbox at home. Salty Dog spots the forgotten lunchbox and heads out on a mission to bring mama her lunch.

“This book introduces a whole new generation to Salty Dog,” said Stefanie Joyner, executive director of History Cherokee. “People who worked at the Mills can now share that experience with their grandchildren as they explore with Salty Dog.”  

“Salty Dog Goes to Denim Day” will be available for purchase only at the Cherokee County History Center and the Cotton Mill Exchange at The Mill on Etowah beginning November 26. Books are available for preorder at historycherokee.org/salty-dog/

Salty Dog was created in 1963 to serve as the mascot for the Canton Cotton Mills’ brand of SCRUBDENIM. The fabric was known for its softening process which was perfected in Canton as a way to make the denim soft while preserving its durability. The use of Salty Dog came from the brand’s slogan, “Soft as a puppy, yet rugged as an old hound dog.” While the Canton Cotton Mills have long been closed, the advancements made there are still used today to make denim comfortable to wear.  

Visit historycherokee.org or call 770-345-3288 for more information on “Salty Dog Goes to Denim Day” or to plan your visit to the Cherokee County History Center.


About History Cherokee

History Cherokee operates the Cherokee County History Center and the Historic Rock Bark. History Cherokee’s mission is the collection, preservation, and interpretation of Cherokee County history.

Blankets Creek will be closed to the public for...

Blankets Creek will be closed to the public for four separate days in November, December, and January. Cherokee Recreation and Parks, which acts as the official land manager for the Blankets Creek property, will host a wildlife management event at Blanket’s Creek Park for the third year in a row. Cherokee County leases the property from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE).

The land in the Blankets Creek area has seen a large increase in the deer population over the last few years, leading to scarce food sources and a safety issue for trail users. In an effort to control the deer population in that area, which is estimated to be hundreds on the 330-acre property, Cherokee Recreation and Parks will hold six deer management events on November 19th, December 17th, January 7th, and January 28th.  The November and December dates will be split into a morning session and an afternoon session. The two January dates will be morning sessions only. The morning sessions will be from first light to 11:30am and the afternoon sessions will be from 2:30pm to last light. The event is for Cherokee County residents only. The morning session on November 19th will be reserved for youth (15 and under) and disabled huntersonly (both will be allowed one chaperone and a maximum of one piece of archery equipment).  Those interested in the lottery may register for the limited spots per session by visiting www.playcherokee.org. Registration periods for the sessions are listed below:

  • November 19th: October 30th - November 12th Drawing: November 13th
  • December 17th: October 30th - December 10th Drawing: December 11th
  • January 7th: October 30th - December 21st Drawing: December 22nd
  • January 28th: October 30th - January 21st Drawing: January 22nd

Hunters will be selected through a lottery process with a maximum of 20 hunters per session. Hunters may register for more than one session but will only be selected through the lottery for a maximum of one session. There will be a $5 non-refundable registration fee and all funds raised will be designated for Blankets Creek Park. Both the USACE and Georgia DNR Rangers will be on site to assist with the event. If selected for a session, there will be an email sent out with more specific details to come regarding safety, boundaries, rules for the hunt, and more.

In addition to the four designated wildlife management event dates, Cherokee Recreation and Parks will also be holding two different permit lotteries for December and January. If selected, this will give archers access to hunt the property from sunrise to 11:00am when the Blankets Creek trails are closed due to inclement weather or undesirable trail conditions. We will draw 30 people to have permits for the month of December and another 30 people to have permits for the month of January. Those interested may register at www.playcherokee.org. Registration periods for the permits are listed below:

  • December Permits – October 30th – November 28th Drawing: November 29th
  • January Permits – October 30th – December 21st Drawing: December 22nd

Hunters may register for both months but will only be selected through the lottery for a maximum of one month. There will be a $25 non-refundable registration fee for the permit lottery and all funds raised will be designated for Blankets Creek Park. You must be a Cherokee County resident to be selected.  If you are drawn for a December or January permit, you will not be allowed to hunt on any of the designated event dates, regardless of weather or trail conditions. If selected in the December or January permit drawings, there will be an email sent out with more specific details to come regarding safety, boundaries, rules for the hunt, and more.

If selected for one of the designated events or selected for a permit, your selection or permit will be non-transferable to another individual. All state hunting laws must be followed, hunters must have a valid hunting license, hunters must wear 500 square inches of orange, and only archery equipment can be used.  State season limits apply. 

Court Appointed Special Advocates of Cherokee County Celebrates 30 Years of Child Advocacy

This year marks 30 years of Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA), a program of The Children’s Haven, serving children experiencing foster care in Cherokee County. CASA volunteers provide child advocacy and are the voice for children, advocating for their best interests. To celebrate and commemorate this special milestone, a luncheon was held to honor CASA volunteers, past and present. Marcie Smith, Executive Director of The Children’s Haven shared, “We are thrilled to celebrate our dedicated CASA volunteers as we honor 30 years of child advocacy in Cherokee County. Our CASA volunteers are the heartbeat of our mission at The Children’s Haven. They truly make a difference in the lives of our kids who are experiencing foster care. We are so grateful for this community and the faithful support they have invested in our work. We know wonderful things will happen in our program’s next 30 years!”

The event was also attended by elected officials, Cherokee County judges, county and state community partners as well as generous sponsors, with Northside Hospital Cherokee as the presenting sponsor for the celebration. Sarah Mackey, Chief Development Officer with National CASA, shared about the history of the CASA organization and Jennifer King, Executive Director of Georgia CASA, thanked the community for supporting our local program and Georgia CASA’s valued work covering all 159 counties in the state of Georgia. Harry Johnston, Chairman of the Cherokee County Board of Commissioners, read a county proclamation, declaring October 20, 2023 as Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) Day in Cherokee County, Georgia in honor of the organization’s 30th Anniversary. State Representative Mandi Ballinger presented a resolution commemorating the 30th anniversary of the CASA program and recognizing the dedicated work of volunteers. Judge Jennifer Davis shared family and child well-being statistics from Cherokee County as well as the state of Georgia, indicating that Cherokee County is the third highest in the state for the number of children in foster care. On October 20th, there were 429 Cherokee County children in foster care. These statistics are a reminder of the significant need for CASA volunteers, as well as highlighting the urgency for additional CASA volunteers in order to provide an advocate for every child experiencing foster care. 

Since its founding 30 years ago in 1993, Court Appointed Special Advocates for Children in Cherokee County has trained 816 community volunteers, advocated for 2,906 children experiencing foster care due to abuse and neglect and donated more than 156,278 hours of service.  Every year, there are more than 10,000 children in Georgia experiencing the foster care system at no fault of their own due to abuse and neglect and they rely on adults to advocate on their behalf. Last year alone, over 167 Cherokee CASA volunteers advocated for nearly 357 children in our state’s legal custody, providing each child with impartial advocacy that nurtures hope, seeks solutions, and stands in the gap between a challenging present and a promising future. A CASA volunteer is a deeply committed, specially trained individual from the community who is appointed by the juvenile court judge to improve a child’s experience in foster care by providing individualized attention, bringing urgency to children’s needs throughout their time in state custody, and offering consistency and continuity by helping to connect information among case managers, foster parents, attorneys, and many other stakeholders.

In celebration of this momentous occasion, the CASA program is aiming to raise $30,000 in honor and celebration of 30 years. CASA volunteers are needed to be the voice for all children in foster care. Funds raised will allow the CASA program to train additional volunteers to serve each child in need. To give, 

volunteer or learn more, please visit CherokeeChildrensHaven.org. Also, follow The Children’s Haven on Facebook, Instagram and Linked In to stay connected to their mission.


CASA is a program of The Children’s Haven. The Children’s Haven is located at 1083 Marietta Hwy., Canton and is home to four programs focused on prevention and support services for at-risk families: Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA), Wellstar Family Visitation Center, Prevent Child Abuse Cherokee In-Home Parenting Program and Chin Up Mentorship Program. The mission at The Children’s Haven is to promote the health and happiness of children impacted by abuse and neglect. For more information, please visit CherokeeChildrensHaven.org.

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