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Local News Archives for 2023-07

Tennis Tournament Fundraiser Friday, September 8th

Circle of Friends recently announced a special gift to the organization, and as a tribute to her legacy, the first Mary Ann Crowe To Serve With Love Tennis Tournament is set for Friday, September 8th from 11:30am - 2:30pm at Woodstock's Cherokee Tennis Center.

The tournament will consist of just 20 teams made up of 2-6 individuals and projected to be split into 3 divisions.  The cost for each team is $200 with all proceeds going towards Circle of Friends and furthering the mission of building a supportive attainable live, work, play housing community.

Tournament chair, Gina Ulicny, will preside over the event and will be assisted by CTC's Director of Tennis, Cameron Leslie. Both are encouraging teams to further fundraising efforts amongst their circles of influence with prizes being awarded to those who raise the most and win the overall tournament.  Prizes include:

 

a picture of Mary Anne CroweREMEMBERING OUR FRIEND:

Circle of Friends was recently gifted a generous donation from a longtime friend and client of the Keen family in excess of $500,000. As part of her will, Mary Ann Crowe (1940-2022) of Alpharetta, Georgia left the organization this sizable gift to be used to further enhance the lives of adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) through the expansion of the team and programs that will directly impact this population.

Mary Ann could be found often at the golf course and tennis courts, as she was a year-round ALTA tennis player into her later years. Fitness was important to her all the way until the end, and through activities, much of her social life revolved around those she played with, especially with her “ladies” from Webb Bridge Park.

City Adopts Public Art Master Plan

Canton Current
Canton Currents Logo

City Adopts Public Art Master Plan

At their July 20 meeting, Council adopted the long-awaited Public Art Master Plan for the City. 

"The Public Art Master Plan lays the foundation for the future of public art in Canton and prepares the City to begin injecting artwork into all facets of the community," said Amanda Golden, Designing Local, the firm that developed the Public Art Master Plan. "The coming public art investments will be a tool to communicate that Canton cares seriously about creativity while providing one-of-a-kind experiences to its residents, further cementing their connection to the place they love most."

"After over a year of collaboration between the Cultural Arts Commission, elected officials, city staff, and the community, I am thrilled to have a tangible plan for the Cultural Arts Commission's vision to make Canton a more beautiful place by celebrating the creativity, diversity, and history of the City," said Kristin Norton Green, Theatre Events & Facilities Director.

 

The Public Art Master Plan is a result of many hours of conversation with stakeholders and members of the public. The team worked diligently to engage a variety of community members from November 2022 until May 2023. The results of community surveys illustrated the community opinion and pulse on public art and will inform future plans. 

Public art will play a crucial role in Canton ensuring high quality experiences for residents, supporting the broader economy, and reinforcing the identity of a place. Artwork types may include, but are not limited to, sculpture, murals or portable paintings, functional art, lighting installations, site-specific, pop-up and temporary, and community participatory.

To view the Public Art Master Plan, visit www.cantonga.gov/artmasterplan

 

 

Circle of Friends Receives Gift of $500k+ to Expand

Circle of Friends Receives Gift of $500k+ to Expand

Circle of Friends was recently gifted a generous donation from a longtime friend and client of the Keen family in excess of $500,000. As part of her will, Mary Ann Crowe (1940-2022) of Alpharetta, Georgia left the organization this sizable gift to be used to further enhance the lives of adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) through the expansion of the team and programs that will directly impact this population.

Founders, Glenn and Diane Keen, have mixed emotions as it relates to the generous gift, with Glenn stating, “My family has known Mary Ann for over 30 years, first as a client of my fathers in the 1980's, and then as a client of mine at Keen & Co. Getting to plan with her to do the things she wanted before she passed was eerie on one hand, but so encouraging on the other”.

Meanwhile, Diane says, “While seeing her last days was hard to accept, we're grateful for her heart and are thankful for how we got to walk hand-in-hand with her. She was such a joy in life, and her gifts are allowing others to experience the same”. Mary Ann was preceded by her late husband, Charles Crowe, a retired Delta pilot.

Similar gifts were given to other near and dear organizations, including Phi Mu, where Mary Ann was a member of the sorority for over 60 years.  Angel Flight, a program served by volunteer pilots to the medically in-need community, was also another notable recipient, as the organization touched the family closely. Other sizable gifts included Emory/St. Joseph’s Hospital as well as Make-A-Wish Foundation.

Mary Ann could be found often at the golf course and tennis courts, as she was a year-round ALTA tennis player into her later years. Fitness was important to her all the way until the end, and through activities, much of her social life revolved around those she played with, especially with her “ladies" from Webb Bridge Park.
Photo of Mary Crowe

To celebrate her legacy, a group of faithful volunteers, chaired by Gina Ulicny, have organized the first Mary Ann Crowe To Serve With Love Charity Tennis Fundraiser, benefiting Circle of Friends. The event will be held on Friday, September 8th at Cherokee Tennis Center in Woodstock, Georgia.  Head Pro, Cameron Leslie, is graciously assisting in the round-robin format with generous prizes to win. To further the fundraising efforts, teams are asked to raise money of their own as a gift to the organization. The fundraiser will be used to further the mission of Circle of Friends in the area of supportive attainable housing.

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The Charlie Ferguson Community Center will Open to the Community Later this Month

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CANTON, GA (July 21, 2023) – The Charlie Ferguson Community Center will open to the community later this month, and at its July 18 meeting, the Cherokee County Board of Commissioners unanimously approved a transition agreement that will turn operations over to the nonprofit within a year.

The community center building is the former home of Cherokee County Fire & Emergency Services Station 9. 

After the County opened the new Station 9 across the street on Reinhardt College Parkway, community members formed the Charlie Ferguson Community Center nonprofit organization. The agreement approved by the Board of Commissioners defines the responsibilities of the parties for the operation of the community center for one year. The County will accept title of the property from the North Canton Volunteer Fire Department and will provide financial support for maintenance and operation of the center at a not-to-exceed cost of $20,000 for the year. 

After one year, the financial solvency of the new nonprofit will be evaluated and if the terms of the agreement are met, Charlie Ferguson Community Center, Inc. shall accept title to the property. Ownership of the property will revert to the county if the nonprofit ceases operating the community center. 

District 1 Commissioner Steve West made the motion, which was seconded by District 2 Commissioner Richard Weatherby.

The North Canton Volunteer Fire Department began in the late 1970s, after Charlie “Snook” Ferguson and his son, Tony, saw the need for fire service in the community. Mr. Ferguson was elected as the first chairman of the North Canton Fire Department in 1979.

The North Canton Volunteer Fire Department was the first African American volunteer fire department in the state of Georgia. The building served, not only as a fire department, but also a community center and recreation center. When the career fire service began countywide, the North Canton Volunteer Fire Department retained ownership of the land and the building. 

Following the opening of the new Station 9, the Cherokee County Board of Commissioners allocated $1.7 million in Community Development Block Grant and Special Purpose Local Option Sales Tax funds to revitalize the building and expand the parking lot so it could return to a community center use for the nearby residents. 

A portion of that allocated funding also included $200,000 in land acquisition to purchase the 

triangle portion (0.40 acres) of the intersection for future alignment of Pea Ridge Road and Reinhardt College Parkway. 

 

At the July 18 meeting, the Board also:

  • Heard Todd Edwards, deputy director of Government Affairs for the Association County Commissioners of Georgia, present the 2023 Legislative Service Award to State Rep. Brad Thomas. 
  • Read into the minutes that the Board of Elections and Registration appointed Steve Divine to the Board of Elections by unanimous vote at its July 3 meeting.
  • Approved, 5-0, the minutes from the June 20 work session, executive session and regular meeting, and the minutes from the executive session and open meeting on June 20 at 1:30 p.m. Commissioner Weatherby made the motion, which was seconded by District 3 Commissioner Benny Carter.
  • Held a public hearing regarding an appeal of a Zoning Board of Appeals case related to a variance request to encroach on a buffer abutting the golf course in Eagle Watch for the installation of a swimming pool. The applicant is the only person who spoke. Prior to the appeal hearing, the applicant submitted a revised request that would reduce the buffer encroachment. District 4 Commissioner Corey Ragsdale made the motion to approve the request to encroach 14 feet into the buffer between the property and the golf course and deny the original request to encroach into the building setback (that portion of the request was no longer required based on the revised plan). The motion was seconded by Commissioner Carter and approved 5-0.
  • Held a public hearing regarding modification of zoning conditions at 4832 Highway 92. Penler, LLC is seeking to reduce the brick façade coverage from 60 percent to 20 percent on garages, mail kiosks and trash compactor on all four sides of the structures. Parks Huff, representing the applicant, said the façade materials conditions for the garages, mail kiosks and trash compactor were overlooked when they applied for rezoning. No one from the public spoke. Commissioner Ragsdale made the motion to approve the request, which was seconded by Commissioner Carter. The vote was 5-0.
  • Held the first of three public hearings on the millage rate. Four people spoke, mainly addressing property values and not the millage rate. The next public hearings will be held Aug. 1 at 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. 
  • Tabled, 5-0, Barry and Dawn Scott’s request to overturn the zoning manager’s decision to reject the zoning review of a business application for Dallas North Lawn Sprinklers LLC at 11397 Bells Ferry Road. Commissioner Carter made the motion, which was seconded by Commissioner Ragsdale. The case will be brought back to the Aug. 15 meeting.
  • Approved, 5-0, Michael Rawlings’ request to rezone 1.18 acres at 5436 Ball Ground Highway from Agriculture to Light Industrial for industrial uses. The request is to clear up a split zoning on the property. Commissioner West made the motion, which was seconded by Commissioner Weatherby.
  • Tabled, 5-0, Elite Hardscapes, LLC’s request to rezone 5.705 acres consisting of General Agriculture, R-40 Single Family Residential and General Commercial to all General Commercial for landscaping services. The request also includes a concurrent variance to reduce the minimum amount of parking spaces from 32 to 17. Commissioner West made the motion to table the request to allow time to rework the plan. The motion was seconded by Commissioner Weatherby. The vote was 5-0. The case will be brought back to the Aug. 1 meeting.
  • Approved, 5-0, Donald Privitt’s request to rezone 0.08 acres from R-80 to R-20 and a different 0.08 acres from R-20 to R-80 as part of a land swap with an adjoining property owner. Commissioner Weatherby made the motion, which was seconded by Commissioner Carter.
  • Approved, 5-0, a request to rezone 3.194 acres on Hickory Flat Highway from Neighborhood Commercial and R-40 to Office/Institutional. The approval included the following conditions: As shown on the attached survey, the northern 3.194 acres will be rezoned to OI. This portion of the property is where the proposed primary medical office will be located; the southern 1.31 acres shall remain zoned Neighborhood Commercial; there shall be no access onto Charles Cox Drive; the front setback for the subject parcel shall be reduced from 75 to 65 feet to accommodate building and overhang intrusions into the front setback; there shall be a 30-foot buffer adjacent to the residentially zoned property as depicted on the site plan with a perimeter fence at a minimum height of four feet; a minimum of a three-foot tall berm and vegetative screening shall be provided along the buffer. To create the screening buffer, the buffer shall be graded and replanted. No Leyland Cypress are allowed within the buffer; and the Georgia Department of Transportation will evaluate for possible right-in and right-out only at the entrance to the Neighborhood Commercial parcel. Commissioner Weatherby made the motion, which was seconded by Commissioner West. 
  •  Approved, 5-0, to consider an appeal of a Zoning Board of Appeals case for JL Metals Holding LLC and call for a public hearing on Sept. 19 at 6 p.m. Commissioner West made the motion, which was seconded by Commissioner Weatherby.
  • Approved, 5-0, calling for a public hearing on Sept. 19 at 6 p.m. to consider a request for the creation of a legacy lot by Mark and Lori Russell. Commissioner Weatherby made the motion, which was seconded by Commissioner Carter.
  • Approved, 5-0, the consent agenda, which included: acceptance of a subgrant agreement in the amount of $175,000 on behalf of Juvenile Court to provide the Multi-Systemic Treatment Program to eligible participants; acceptance of a subrecipient agreement in the amount of $500,000 with the Canton Housing Authority for the Tanner Place project from the county’s ARPA 2021 allocation; amendment one to the Senior Services ARPA subgrant agreement from the Atlanta Regional Commission to extend the grant term to June 29, 2024; the CATS FY2024 5310 Department of Human Services application; acceptance of GDOT Local Maintenance & Improvement Grant funding totaling $200,000 and authorization of a budget amendment in the same amount per the approved application for LMIG FY2023 Safety Action Plan funds; amendment one to the agreement with Georgia Fire and Rescue Supply to purchase firefighting gloves for an additional one-year term in the amount of $137.50 per set, with an expected annual spend of $30,000; a new part-time case manager position for Senior Services for the Respite Care Program and a budget amendment totaling $12,179; and surplussing several computers, monitors and miscellaneous items from the Information Technology from the Justice Center. Commissioner Ragsdale made the motion, which was seconded by Commissioner West.
  • Approved, 5-0, the annual renewal of the Network Cyber Security Operations Center in the amount of $74,760. Commissioner Carter made the motion, which was seconded by Commissioner Ragsdale.
  • Approved, 5-0, the purchase of one new or used Chevrolet Suburban or Tahoe for the Coroner’s Office at a not-to-exceed cost of $60,000. Commissioner Weatherby made the motion, which was seconded by Commissioner Carter.
  • Approved, 5-0, a standard construction services agreement with Crown Service Contractors in the amount of $35,663 and a 15 percent county-controlled contingency for construction of a gear storage building at Fire Station 17 – Lake Arrowhead. Commissioner Ragsdale made the motion, which was seconded by Commissioner Carter.
  • Approved, 5-0, a contract with Remac Inc. for crack-filling and repairs for the parking lot at the Bluffs Administration Building. The total cost is $35,153. Commissioner Carter made the motion, which was seconded by Commissioner Weatherby.
  • Approved, 5-0, condemnation resolutions authorizing the County to proceed with the condemnation processes for four parcels and four off-premises signs for the Bells Ferry widening project. Commissioner Carter made the motion, which was seconded by Commissioner Ragsdale.
  • Approved, 5-0, the lease of 85 Flock cameras including Flock Safety Advanced Search for the Sheriff’s Office for a total cost of $983,250 over five years. Commissioner Weatherby made the motion, which was seconded by Commissioner West.
  • Approved, 5-0, a Professional Services Agreement with Pieper O’Brien Herr Architects, Ltd. for design and engineering services for renovation and repairs of the Arts Center Building in downtown Canton. The cost is $159,000. Commissioner Ragsdale made the motion, which was seconded by Commissioner Carter. The Arts Center Building will be used for Justice Center functions until the Justice Center annex project is complete. After completion, the plan is to utilize the space as an arts center.  
  • Tabled, 5-0, a contract with Latimer Construction for the construction of a block security wall outside the Jury Assembly Room at the Justice Center. The purpose is to secure the room so it can be used as a courtroom in the event there is a case with multiple defendants. The cost is $48,000. Commissioner West made the motion, which was seconded by Commissioner Weatherby. Commissioner West indicated there may be a less costly solution. 
  • Approved, 5-0, a five-year commercial lease agreement for approximately 5,348 square feet at 181 East Main St. in downtown Canton to provide additional office space for the District Attorney and support staff. Commissioner West made the motion, which was seconded by Commissioner Weatherby.
  • Approved, 5-0, the purchase of networking equipment for the installation at 181 East Main St. for a total cost of $33,936.48. Commissioner Ragsdale made the motion, which was seconded by Commissioner Carter.
  • Approved, 5-0, the purchase and installation of office furniture from Impact Office Interiors for the leased office space at 181 East Main St., in the amount of $95,400. Commissioner Ragsdale made the motion, which was seconded by Commissioner Carter.
  • Approved, 5-0, the Safe Streets and Roads for All agreement with the U.S. Department of Transportation and the Federal Highway Administration. The County was notified earlier this year that it and its cities have received a $450,000 action plan grant. Commissioner Carter made the motion, which was seconded by Commissioner Ragsdale.
  • Approved, 5-0, an agreement with Milton Brown & Associates Inc. to provide drug treatment and counseling services for the Family Treatment Court. Commissioner Weatherby made the motion, which was seconded by Commissioner Carter.
  • Approved, 5-0, an agreement with Intuitive Counseling Associates to provide drug treatment and counseling services for the Juvenile Drug Treatment Court. Commissioner Ragsdale made the motion, which was seconded by Commissioner Carter. 

 

ABOUT CHEROKEE COUNTY

Located 30 miles north of downtown Atlanta, Cherokee County is part of the 11-county metro-Atlanta area. Cherokee County boasts a population of more than 281,000, according to the July 2022 Census estimates. It is the one of the fastest growing counties in the metro region and its overall Board of Commissioners-controlled tax burden per capita is one of the lowest in the region.  Cherokee County has award-winning parks and recreational facilities, is a destination for corporate headquarters and is a great place to live, work and play. Cherokee County is the best of both worlds because it’s where “Metro Meets the Mountains.” Learn more at cherokeega.com.

FROM THE ALZHEIMER'S ASSOCIATION INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE 2023

HEARING AIDS SLOW COGNITIVE DECLINE IN OLDER ADULTS WITH HEARING LOSS AND AT RISK FOR COGNITIVE DECLINE


Key Takeaways:

  •  Largest clinical trial to investigate whether a hearing loss treatment intervention can reduce risk of cognitive decline.

 

  • In the study, in a subgroup of older adults with hearing loss who were at higher risk of cognitive decline, using hearing aids for three years cut cognitive decline in half.

AMSTERDAM, JULY 18, 2023 — Results from the Aging and Cognitive Health Evaluation in Elders (ACHIEVE) study, the largest randomized, controlled clinical trial of hearing aids for reducing long-term cognitive decline in older adults, were reported for the first time at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference® (AAIC®) 2023, in Amsterdam, Netherlands, and online.

While the results were negative in the total study population, the hearing intervention slowed cognitive decline in older adults with mild to moderate hearing loss by 48% in a pre-specified segment of the study population consisting of the 238 people participating in an ongoing observational study of heart health.

The findings from the ACHIEVE study were simultaneously published in The Lancet.
The ACHIEVE study is a randomized trial of older adults aged 70-84 with untreated hearing loss who were free from substantial cognitive impairment, conducted at four U.S. sites. 977 total participants were recruited from two study populations:and 739 healthy community volunteers newly recruited to the study.
According to the researchers, at the start of the trial, all study participants generally had mild to moderate hearing loss very typical of older adults, but no substantial cognitive impairment.

The three-year intervention included use of hearing aids, a hearing “toolkit” to assist with self-management, and ongoing instruction and counseling with an audiologist. The comparison group health education control group had talk sessions with a health educator about chronic disease prevention. The total study population was analyzed, hearing intervention versus health education control; the ARIC and community subgroups were also analyzed in this manner. The primary endpoint
was three-year change in a comprehensive neurocognitive testing battery, which included procedures to help ensure that hearing loss would not affect the results.
The results of the comparison of hearing intervention versus control in the total study population were negative, as was the community population comparison of hearing intervention versus control. The most interesting result was the comparison of the ARIC subgroup hearing intervention versus control, in which a 48% slowing of cognitive decline was observed.
The researchers noted that the participants from the ARIC study had more risk factors for cognitive decline, lower baseline cognitive scores, and a faster rate of three-year cognitive decline during the study than the others.
“The positive results with the hearing intervention in the ARIC subgroup analysis are encouraging and warrant further investigation,” said Maria C. Carrillo, Ph.D., Alzheimer’s Association chief science officer. “Previous research has identified hearing loss as potentially the single largest dementia risk factor that can be addressed or modified with existing tools that remain underutilized.”
The ACHIEVE researchers cite hearing loss as present in 65% of adults over age 60. Identifying dementia prevention strategies that can be implemented globally is an urgent priority.
“The hearing intervention had a significant effect on reducing cognitive change within three years in the population of older adults in the study who are at increased risk for cognitive decline,” said Frank Lin, M.D., Ph.D., of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Bloomberg School of Public Health, and co-primary investigator of the ACHIEVE study. “Hearing loss is very treatable in later life, which makes it an important public health target to reduce risk of cognitive decline and dementia, along with other dementia risk factors such as less education in early life, high blood pressure, social isolation and physical inactivity.”
“The encouraging subgroup results are consistent with our understanding that strategies to reduce cognitive decline and dementia risk will likely need to affect more than one pathway to be successful.
The Alzheimer’s Association’s ongoing U.S. POINTER Study is taking that approach through targeting multiple risk factors at the same time in a diverse, representative study population,” Carrillo said.
Findings from the ACHIEVE study suggest that older adults at increased risk for cognitive decline and dementia who also have hearing loss may benefit the most from this hearing intervention within three years. According to the ACHIEVE researchers, the hearing intervention may slow down decline in thinking and memory by making listening easier for the brain, or by helping people remain more socially and physically active.
“In both the ARIC group and the new group of community volunteers, we also found that the hearing intervention improved communication abilities, social functioning and loneliness,” Lin said. “Until we know more, we recommend for general health and well-being that older adults have their hearing checked regularly and any hearing issues properly addressed.”
More research is needed to investigate how the hearing aids and counseling provided the cognitive benefit, and to understand the longer-term benefits of the hearing intervention.

About the Alzheimer's Association International Conference® (AAIC®)

The Alzheimer’s Association International Conference (AAIC) is the world’s largest gathering of researchers from around the world focused on Alzheimer’s and other dementias. As a part of the Alzheimer’s Association’s research program, AAIC serves as a catalyst for generating new knowledge about dementia and fostering a vital, collegial research community.

About the Alzheimer's Association®
The Alzheimer’s Association is the leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer's care, support and research. Our mission is to lead the way to end Alzheimer's and all other dementia — by accelerating global research, driving risk reduction and early detection, and maximizing quality care and support. Visit
alz.org or call +1 800.272.3900.

JUST IN

Cherokee County Georgia

Communications Division
1130 Bluffs Parkway
Canton, GA 30114
CherokeeGA.com

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CANTON, GA (July 18, 2023) -- Cherokee County’s online portal used for planning and zoning documents is undergoing a revitalization effort.

The County’s Information Technology Services Department is implementing more stringent security protocols and redeveloping the platform for a more user-friendly experience. 

“Cherokee Status and CityView are great tools that allow residents access to development applications and supporting documents, purchase GIS tiles, calculate permit fees, and other tasks from the comfort of their home,” said Community Development Agency Director Brantley Day. “While you can still access these documents by creating a free CityView account, the experience may be different, and we ask for your patience as the ITS department completes this project.”

To create a free CityView account, visit cityview.cherokeega.com, click sign in and then register. Anyone with questions can always call the County’s Community Development Agency at 678-493-6077.

ABOUT CHEROKEE COUNTY

Located 30 miles north of downtown Atlanta, Cherokee County is part of the 11-county metro-Atlanta area. Cherokee County boasts a population of more than 279,000, according to the 2022 Atlanta Regional Commission population estimates. It is the one of the fastest growing counties in the metro region and its overall Board of Commissioners-controlled tax burden per capita is one of the lowest in the region.  Cherokee County has world-class parks and recreational facilities, is a destination for corporate headquarters and is a great place to live, work and play. Cherokee County is the best of both worlds because it’s where “Metro Meets the Mountains.” Learn more at cherokeega.com.

MAYOR STEVE LAWRENCE ANNOUNCES THAT HE WILL NOT RUN FOR RE-ELECTION

 

 (Jasper, GA) – Mayor Steve Lawrence announced today that he will not seek a second term as Mayor of Jasper due to recent health challenges. “I am starting the most important fight of my life as I begin treatment for cancer. While I have every intention of beating this disease, I must focus my full attention on this battle and on my family.” 

Mayor Lawrence plans to finish his current term in office, which ends December 31, 2023, but acknowledged that there may be times when he is unable to attend Council meetings. Should those situations arise, the Mayor will rely on Jasper’s very experienced City Council, and especially Council Member Kirk Raffield, who serves as the Mayor Pro Tem, to take the lead, stating that he “has complete confidence in Mr. Raffield’s ability to lead this Council. 

“I am proud of the progress the City has made during my time in office, but there is work still to be done,” said Mayor Lawrence. “It is important to keep the initiatives we’ve been working on moving forward for the betterment of our community. I have complete confidence that Mayor Pro Tem Kirk Raffield and the Council will continue to move the City of Jasper forward.” 

Lawrence added “Our community will benefit from Kirk’s experience on Council, his level-headedness, and his commitment to give back to the city that he grew up in.” 

Finally, Mayor Lawrence stated: “It is an honor to serve as your Mayor. At the end of the day, all that we as elected leaders can hope for is that we have made a difference to better our community. My intention is to continue to meet that goal until my elected time of service has ended. Thank you all for your continued support and prayers.” 

WLJA 101.1 FM's Gospel Top 30

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

JULY TOP 30 GOSPEL SONGS

 


  1. "Stay Their Arms" Primitive Quartet

  2. "Old Country Baptizing" Zoe & Cloyd
  3. "Way Up On The Mountain" Becky Isaacs Bowman
  4. "Dust On The Altar" McKamey Legacy
  5. "Way Up On The Hill" Eagle's Wings
  6. "Beautiful" The Nelons
  7. "I Will Not Cry Today" The Chuck Wagon Gang
  8. "For The Life Of Me" Mark Trammell Quartet?
  9. "Ready For The Change" The Kingsmen?
  10. "What A Morning" The Inspirations?
  11. "Jordan" Darin & Brooke Aldridge ft. Ricky Scaggs and Mo Pitney?
  12. "Lost and Found" Southbound
  13. "Anywhere Jesus Is" Scotty Inman?
  14. "Big God" Daryl Mosley ft. Ronnie Booth?
  15. "At The Cross" Chosen Road?
  16. "Calvary's Touch" The Perrys
  17. "All Things" The Sound?
  18. "Think About There" Greater Vision?
  19. "Dance" Karen Peck & New River?
  20. "One Name" Jeff & Sheri Easter
  21. "Just As Sure" Mylon Hayes Family?
  22. "I Know My Savior Cares" Ernie Haase & Signature Sound?
  23. "Freedom Band" The Hoppers?
  24. "You'll Find Me" Authentic Unlimitied?
  25. "Everybody Will Be Happy Over There" Old Time Preachers Quartet?
  26. "The Glory Road" Joe Mullins & The Radio Ramblers?
  27. "The Blessing" Triumphant Quartet ft. Karen Peck?
  28. "Bragging On Jesus" The Steeles?
  29. "Jesus & Me" Jordan Family Band?
  30. "Nobody Like Jesus" The LeFevre Quartet?

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